Connecting and Blending a Family at Dinner

January 14, 2013

in Blending a Family

American Girl Cafe NYCSitting in American Girl Cafe waiting for our server to greet us, Princess Daisy spotted a bright pink box in the middle of the table. In it were slips of paper with questions. She loved the idea of taking turns posing questions, which started one of the most memorable meals we had in New York City last weekend. All of us enjoyed the activity, but for me, it was more than simply entertainment.

Becoming a family with children who are over the age of 10, and marrying a 41-year-old man poses similar problems; it means they have had many life experiences before coming into my life. The same challenge is actually true for all of us in this newly-forming family.

Taking turns answering the questions in the box last weekend was a wonderful way for us to begin to know each other on another level, and to aid in blending together as a family. Before our question-filled lunch last Friday, we didn’t all know each other’s favorite summer memory, the three famous people we would like to meet and why, or what we consider the hardest thing we have had to do in life. Having a box of questions allowed us to pick a topic and start a conversation that led to a greater understanding of one another.

Whether a family is coming together as the result of a second marriage or a family has teens who no longer want to speak much during a meal, having conversation starters in a box is an excellent family activity. It is a wonderful way to connect or reconnect as a family, and an activity I look forward to initiating again the next weekend the six of us will be together. This box of cards will be a great start for us:

Do you have any dinnertime activities that help you bond as a family?

If so, please share!

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

@bluenotebacker January 14, 2013 at 2:20 pm

Thanks for sharing this, Kelly, it’s a fantastic idea! We’re mixing families too, and while so far the kids are getting along, I imagine this would go a long way to bringing all of us even closer together :)
@bluenotebacker recently posted..Wednesday Eats – The BlockMy Profile

Reply

Naked Girl in a Dress January 14, 2013 at 2:26 pm

We have been doing well with coming together. Sean and I continue to be amazed at how much the kids like each other as well as us. He jokes, “It’s unfortunate the kids don’t get along” when we are watching them giggle and play together. This activity simply helped us strip away the day-to-day questions about how the day was, what we want to do over the weekend, etc. It allowed us to learn more about each other through a fun activity.

Reply

Jenny January 14, 2013 at 7:36 pm

Oh, I like this! My sister started a tradition with my kids where they go around the table saying the best and then worst part of their days. Which, on the surface, doesn’t sound unusual, but what makes it different is that everyone at the table applauds not only for the best part of each other’s day but also the worst part! Obviously, we haven’t had any truly bad days since this tradition started, or I think the applause would get pretty old. In our house, I decided we’d boo and hiss when the *worst* thing was really a bad one. With a 9-year-old being my oldest, I suppose we’re not far from things that are really much worse than “so-and-so got to hold the class pet for a lot longer than I did.” :)
Jenny recently posted..Top 10 Uses for My Post-Partum Gut RollMy Profile

Reply

Naked Girl in a Dress January 14, 2013 at 8:49 pm

Jenny,

We talk about best and worst parts of our day all the time. It really helps me understand what the kids are going through each day. I love your way of discussing similar topics in your home. Applause is brilliant!

Reply

Leave a Comment

CommentLuv badge

Previous post:

Next post: